Summer up North, Smoked Mackerel Rillettes With Rye Crisps Recipe from ScandiKitchen Midsommar by Bronte Aurell

Summer lunch up North (meaning Scandinavia) has seafood rillettes on the menu.

Like this Smoked Mackerel Rillettes With Rye Crisps recipe from ScandiKitchen: Midsommar: Simply Delicious Food for Summer Days (Ryland Peters & Small, 2018, 2021) by Brontë Aurell, co-owner of ScandiKitchen in West London.

Smoked Mackerel Rillettes With Rye Crisps

This is a super-easy way to prepare an appetizer or light lunch. Rillettes are a coarse, potted meat similar to pâté that are stirred together and spread on toast. They’re usually made with fatty pork (or duck) leftovers, but I love making rillettes with fish. This recipe works well with both smoked mackerel and smoked salmon.

Smoked Mackerel Rillettes from ScandiKitchen Midsommar

Ingredients:

8–12 thin slices of rye bread or store-bought rye crisps (available in supermarkets) 

200 ml/3⁄4 cup crème fraîche

2 teaspoons Dijon mustard

3 tablespoons chopped chives

squeeze of fresh lime juice

1⁄2 teaspoon horseradish sauce

300 g/10 1⁄2 oz. smoked mackerel

freshly ground black pepper (hold the salt until you taste it, some mackerel is very salty)

TO SERVE

1⁄4 small fennel bulb

1⁄2 apple

freshly squeezed lemon juice

fresh pea shoots

4 individual serving glasses

Serves 4 as a generous appetizer or light lunch

Directions:

If using rye bread, preheat the oven to 140°C (275°F) Gas 1. Slice the rye bread very thinly and place on a baking tray. If the bread is too thick it will be hard to eat as crispy bread, so do make sure it is thinly sliced. Bake in the preheated oven for about 10–20 minutes (depending on your bread) until completely dry. You can make it several days ahead and store in an airtight container.

Mix the crème fraîche with the mustard, chives, lime juice and horseradish (if using). Remove the skin from the mackerel and add the fish to the crème fraîche mixture. Stir just until mixed – I like my rillettes with a few chunky bits, but some people prefer it smoother. If you like yours smoother, simply mix a while longer. Check for seasoning and add black pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the serving glasses. Chill until ready to serve.

When ready to serve, slice the fennel and apple very thinly, ideally using a mandoline. Add a squeeze of lemon juice to stop the apple going brown and mix well. Serve the apple and fennel salad with pea shoots, the glasses of mackerel and the rye toast on the side. You may need extra toast as the mackerel makes a generous portion.

( Reproduced with permission from ScandiKitchen: Midsommar: Simply Delicious Food for Summer Days By Brontë AurellRyland Peters & Small, 2021 / photography by Peter Cassidy © Ryland Peters & Small, 2018, 2021)

P.S: Please note that the recipes in ScandiKitchen: Midsommar are the same as in ScandiKitchen Summer, which was published in 2018.


Crustacean Eating Red Mullet Makes for Smooth Pink Whole Thai Fish Skewers, from Skewered by Marcus Bawdon

Crustacean eating red mullet makes for smooth pink Whole Thai Fish Skewers, a recipe from Skewered: Recipes for Fire Food on Sticks from Around the World by Marcus Bawdon (© Dog ‘n’ Bone, April 27, 2021)

WHOLE THAI FISH SKEWERS

I’m a lover of red mullet and I think it’s much under-rated by a lot of folk. It’s a lovely pink, smooth-skinned fish, and the flesh is delicate with a shellfish flavor from all the prawns/shrimp and crustaceans it eats.
I figured it would work well with a red Thai curry coating and a nice crispy, slightly charred skin. This is a lovely way to cook fish as you get a crisp skin, without fear of the fish sticking because it’s not in contact with the grill grates.

Skewered p 128

Feeds 2

RECOMMENDED HEAT: Moderate coals

Ingredients:

2 red mullet, gutted and scaled
2 tbsp Thai red curry paste
coarse sea salt
lime wedges, to serve

CHOOSE YOUR SKEWER
long flat metal skewers

Directions:

Set up a narrow grill so that the skewers go across both sides so that the fish can be supported just above the coals.

Skewer the fish through the head, body and out through the tail end. Make a couple of slashes in the thick part of the body to help even cooking, and to allow the curry paste to penetrate the flesh. Season lightly with the salt, and then brush on the Thai red curry paste. Make sure the fish has a nice even coating of the paste.

Place the fish skewers over the coals and turn occasionally, making sure the char on the skin doesn’t get too dark. Total cooking time should be 10–12 minutes or until the thickest part of the fish has an internal temperature of 55°C/130°F on a digital probe thermometer.
Finish with a squeeze of lime juice and serve with some fragrant jasmine rice, if liked.

Skewered cover

(* Excerpted from Skewered: Recipes from Around the World for Fire Food on Sticks by Marcus Bawdon - © Dog ‘n’ Bone, 2021- Photography by Marcus Bawdon)


Cannon No 1 Treat, Meyer Lemon Coconut Cheesescake from Baking at the 20 th Century Café by Michelle Polzine

Cannon N0 1 treat with no close contest: Meyer Lemon Cheesecake from Baking at the 20th Century Cafe 'Iconic European Desserts from Linzer Torte to Honey Cake' (Artisan Books, October 2020) by San Francisco baker extraordinaire Michelle Polzine

Cecil Cannon’s Favorite Meyer Lemon–Coconut Cheesecake

Cecil Cannon, the most remarkable child I have ever known, sprang from the loins of my soul brother, Vince Cannon, a Marxist punk rocker in the guise of a corporate lawyer, with a sense of humor even more bawdy than my own. She’s always got her nose stuck in a book (her stepmother, Claire, is an English professor) and is not afraid to speak her mind. Cecil has boldly declared Easter to be her favorite holiday, because that’s when I make Meyer lemon cheesecake. I in turn declare this to be Cecil Cannon’s Meyer Lemon–Coconut Cheesecake. Don’t expect her to share her piece with you.

Meyer Lemon Coconut Cheesecake BAKING AT THE 20TH CENTURY CAFE

As with the Vanilla Cheesecake, you bake the cake and crust separately and then perform the same tricky invert-­flip-­flip move to combine them. You can make the cake up to 3 days ahead, but don’t combine crust and cake until shortly before you plan to serve this, or the crust will get soggy. If you must put it together in advance, brush the crust with a thin layer of melted white chocolate before attaching it to the cheesecake.

Makes one 9-­ or 10-­inch (23-­ or 25-­centimeter) cake; serves 12

Ingredients:

For the Cheesecake

26 ounces (737 grams) cream cheese (see Note, opposite), at room temperature

1 cup plus 2 tablespoons (255 grams) crème fraîche, homemade or store-­bought, at room temperature

3 tablespoons (18 grams) grated Meyer lemon zest

3 large eggs, at room temperature

2 large egg yolks, at room temperature

¾ cup (148 grams) granulated sugar

3 tablespoons (45 milliliters) Meyer lemon juice

Pinch of kosher salt

For the Crust

2 cups (226 grams) fine unsweetened dried coconut (sometimes called macaroon coconut)

¼ cup (28 grams) confectioners’ sugar

¼ teaspoon kosher salt

4 tablespoons (57 grams) unsalted butter, melted and cooled

1 tablespoon beaten egg white

2 teaspoons granulated sugar for sprinkling

Directions:

Make the cheesecake: Preheat the oven to 300°F (150°C). Line a 10-inch (25-­centimeter) or 9-­by-­3-­inch (23-­by-­8-­centimeter) round cake pan with parchment and set aside.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (or in a large bowl, using a wooden spoon), paddle the cream cheese, crème fraîche, and lemon zest on low speed until creamy and smooth (the goal is not to add air to the mixture, which would cause the cheesecake to pouf while baking and then crack). Add the eggs one at a time, followed by the yolks, mixing after each addition until incorporated. Add the granulated sugar, lemon juice, and salt and mix, still on low speed, until homogeneous. Transfer to the prepared baking pan and smooth the top with an offset spatula.

Fold a paper towel into quarters and set it in the center of a roasting pan. Set the cake pan on top of the paper towel to prevent the bottom of the cake from overcooking and to keep the cake pan from sliding around when you move the roasting pan, then add enough hot water to the roasting pan to come halfway up the sides of the cake pan. Transfer to the oven and bake until the center of the cheesecake is set, about 50 minutes. Let cool in the water bath, then transfer to the refrigerator and chill for at least 4 hours. (The cake can be made up to 3 days ahead.)

Make the crust: Preheat the oven to 275°F (133°C). Using a dark marker, draw a circle the size of the pan you are using on a sheet of parchment, then flip the paper over and place it on a sheet pan.

In a medium bowl, combine the coconut, confectioners’ sugar, and salt. Stir in the butter and egg white until combined. Transfer to the center of the circle you traced and press into an even 10-­inch (25-­centimeter) or 9-­inch (23-­centimeter) round, depending on the size of the pan you’re using to bake the cake.

Bake the crust until golden brown, 12 to 15 minutes, then transfer the pan to a wire rack and let cool completely. Once it is cool, carefully peel off the parchment.

To assemble the cheesecake: Remove the cheesecake from the refrigerator. Run a small offset spatula, with the front of it facing outward, around the edges of the cake, pressing against the pan so you don’t cut into the cake. Then swirl the pan over a low burner to warm the bottom slightly and make it easier to remove the cheesecake from the pan. Blot any moisture that has accumulated on the surface of the cake with a paper towel, then sprinkle the surface of the cake with the granulated sugar. Take a deep breath! Invert a flat plate over the cheesecake and, in one fluid motion, turn the cheesecake out onto the plate. Carefully peel the parchment from the bottom of the cake, then set the baked crust on top of the cake. Invert a serving plate over the cake and (deep breath again!), in one fluid motion, invert the cake onto the serving platter so the crust is now on the bottom. With a sharp paring knife, trim any excess crust.

Cut the cake into wedges and serve.

(*Excerpted from Baking at the 20th Century Cafe by Michelle Polzine -Artisan Books-. Copyright © 2020. Photographs by Aya Brackett.)


Infuse Your Nightcap with Negroni Bianco Bergamotto from Negroni More than 30 Classics by David T. Smith and Keli Rivers

Infuse Your Nightcap with Negroni Bianco Bergamotto from Negroni: More than 30 Classic and Modern Recipes for Italy’s iconic Cocktail (Ryland Peters & Small, 2021) by David T. Smith and Keli Rivers. 

NEGRONI BIANCO BERGAMOTTO

Italy is the home of the Negroni and this variation includes a few extra ingredients from the bel paese. The Italicus Bergamotto liqueur not only comes in a bottle that is itself a work of art, but it is flavored with botanicals such as yellow rose, gentian, chamomile and bergamot orange. The sparkling prosecco adds a bright zing and liveliness to this drink.

Negroni Bianco

Ingredients:

25 ml/3⁄4 oz. Seven Hills Gin (or Twisted Nose Gin)

25 ml/3⁄4 oz. Suze

25 ml/3⁄4 oz. Dolin Bianco

25 ml/3⁄4 oz. Italicus Rosolio di Bergamotto Liqueur prosecco, to top up 

GARNISH

orange wheel

SERVES 1

Directions:

Add the ingredients (except the prosecco) to a large, ice-filled wine glass and gently stir. Top up with chilled prosecco and garnish with an orange wheel to serve.

Negroni cover

(*From Negroni: More than 30 Classic and Modern Recipes for Italy’s iconic Cocktail by David T. Smith and Keli Rivers, Ryland Peters & Small/ Photos are by Alex Luck © Ryland Peters & Small 2021)


Himono Nights, French Air Dry their Laundry, Japanese Air Dry their Fish, Balcony a Plus

French air dry their laundry, Japanese their fish, balcony a plus.

Air dried fish food sake tokyo

What you can see above as described by Yukari Sakamot0 in her own words:

"The fish hanging are sayori halfbeak. When we make himono (air-dried fish) at home we usually hang the fish out overnight and then after that we move the fish into the freezer or refrigerator."

Yukari Sakamoto is the author of 'Food, Sake, Tokyo', The Blog, and also The Book 

Fish at night for Tokyo Thursdays #319

(* Photo courtesy of Yukari Sakamoto, location details: "#Teradomari #寺泊 is a charming village on the Sea of Japan. This #Niigata #新潟 town has about a dozen seafood and omiyage souvenir shops facing the sea"...taken a few years ago)


Artisan Pizza pairs with Craft Beers of Pacific Northwest for Friday Book Giveaway Number 6

No connection whatsoever between snow melting and this week selection, Artisan Pizza and Craft Beers of the Pacific Northwest, our 2 books for Friday Book Giveaway Number 6.

Book cleaning before Spring...

First, Artisan Pizza, To Make Perfectly At Home (Kyle Books, 2015) by Giuseppe Mascoli of Franco Manca and Bridget Hugo.

Artisan pizza

Secondly, Craft Beers of the Pacific Northwest (Timber Press, 2011)  by Lisa M, Morrison

Craft beers of pacific northwest

-Question: City where Timber Press is based

First come first serve.

E-mail your answers to: s.ls [at] mediterraneanworkandplay [dot] com

Friday Book Giveaway Number 6


Naturally Lean by Allyson Kramer plus Foolproof Freezer Cookbook by Ghillie James, 2 Book Giveaway Number 5

After skipping last Friday due to a cold, Naturally Lean and Foolproof Freezer Cookbook are 2 Book Giveaway Number 5 lineup.

Each Giveaway is a Twofer, book cleaning before Spring.

First, plant based and gluten free recipes in Naturally Lean (Da Capo Lifelong, May 2016) by Allyson Kramer

Naturally lean

Secondly, Foolproof Freezer Cookbook (Kyle Books, 2011) by Ghillie James.

Foolproof freezer

-Question: Where is Ghillie James currently residing?

First come first serve.

E-mail your answers to: s.ls [at] mediterraneanworkandplay [dot] com

2 Book Giveaway Number 5


Don't Drop the Ball, Lache Pas La Boulette, Shrimp Boulettes Recipe from Mosquito Supper Club Cookbook

Don't drop the ball, lache pas la boulette, with this Shrimp Boulettes recipe from Mosquito Supper Club (Artisan Books, April 2020) by Melissa Martin.

Shrimp Boulettes

Shrimp boulettes, or fried shrimp balls, might remind you of Thai fish cakes or Vietnamese shrimp on sugarcane. The shrimp is ground up and fried without any flour or cornmeal (shrimp is sticky enough to bind the vegetables together, so you don’t need to add any filler). Eat the boulettes as a snack with hot sauce, or put some on a roll with bitter greens, cocktail sauce, or spicy mayo to turn them into a sandwich. Either way, they are a great way to eat small fresh shrimp.

Serves 6

Shrimp Boulette Mosquite Supper Club

Ingredients:

¾ cup (110 g) coarsely chopped green bell pepper

2 tablespoons coarsely chopped green onion

¼ cup (25 g) coarsely chopped celery

2 tablespoons coarsely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

1¼ pounds (565 g) peeled and deveined small or medium shrimp

1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more as needed

⅛ teaspoon cracked black pepper, plus more as needed

⅛ teaspoon cayenne pepper, plus more as needed

1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon hot sauce, preferably Original Louisiana Hot Sauce, plus more as needed

Peanut oil, for frying

Directions:

In a large bowl, combine the bell pepper, green onion, celery, parsley, shrimp, salt, black pepper, cayenne, and hot sauce and toss to distribute the ingredients evenly. Using an old-fashioned meat grinder or a food processor, grind the mixture together. If using a food processor, work in small batches and pulse until smooth, then transfer to a bowl. In either case, after grinding, you should not see any vegetables; the boulette mix should be a homogenous paste.

Fill a large heavy-bottomed pot with 4 inches (10 cm) of peanut oil and heat the oil over medium-high heat to 375°F (190°C). (Alternatively, use a tabletop fryer; see page 25.)

Using two spoons or a small (#100) cookie scoop, form a ball of the boulette mix no bigger than the diameter of a quarter and carefully drop it into the hot oil. Fry this tester boulette for about 6 minutes, until golden brown on the outside. Transfer the boulette to a paper towel or a brown paper bag to drain excess oil and let it cool. Taste the boulette: Does the mix need more salt? More pepper or more heat? Add salt, black pepper, cayenne, or hot sauce to your liking—I like boulettes to have a slight vinegary taste, and hot sauce gives them that flavor. There is no one perfect formula. You have to taste your mix every time.

Once you have adjusted your mix, drop about 15 balls at a time into the hot oil and fry until golden brown, about 6 minutes. Transfer the boulettes to paper towels or brown paper bags to drain and cool briefly, then serve.

The boulette mix will keep, covered, in the refrigerator for 2 days. If making ahead of time, add the salt right before frying to keep the mix from getting watery.

(“Excerpted from Mosquito Supper Club by Melissa Martin -Artisan Books- Copyright © 2020. Photographs by Denny Culbert")